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The Nalanda monks recite Sanghata Sutra online


Posted by losang_gendun ® (), May 28,2007,13:10 Post Reply   Forum

Dear forum members,

Starting on Saka Dawa (May 31) - the day on which Tibetans celebrate the birth, enlightenment and final passing of Shakyamuni Buddha - me and my fellow monks will do a marathon, reciting The Ârya Sanghâta Sûtra in order to benefit sentient beings and receive the blessings of this incredible sutra, as well as raise the remaining funds needed to complete our new building project.

This Sutra recitation will be broadcast live via a webcam 24 hours a day for at least 14 days to raise the 108,888 euros we hope to collect, and for all who view the event to receive the blessings of this Sutra. The recitation can be seen live anywhere in the world at www.nalanda-monastery.eu/sanghata.

I myself will recite daily from 2:30 to 4 am and from 2:30 to 3 pm (CMT+1)

I hope you will come and take a look and enjoy my recitation and of course the recitations of the other monks. I also hope you might be able to give us a hand and help us raise the money to finish the New Building Project before the start of the 5 year study program in 2008. What can you do:

- Sponsor me and my fellow monks. You can send a donation using Credit Card or PayPal, using the links on the www.nalanda-monastery.eu/sanghata page.

- Help us spread the word and forward this information to anyone you think might be interested in our cause to maintain the Buddha's teachings, especially in the Tibetan tradition that has suffered so dearly, and train high quality teachers and practitioners.

The Sanghata Sutra is a Mahayana Buddhist Sutra, but unlike other sutras the Sanghata records a discourse in which the Buddha explains that he had heard the Sanghata from a previous Buddha. This sutra explains how it transforms all those who encounter it. It is an extraordinary literary adventure, full of stories of death, discovery and magical transformations, but first and foremost, the Sanghata is about what can happen to its readers.

If you are interested in the text and maybe want to read it with us (it is available in 14 languages), you can visit:
http://www.fpmt.org/teachers/zopa/advice/sanghatasutra.asp

or if you are interested in it's history and meaning, please go to:
http://www.sanghatasutra.net/

I hope you will enjoy my and my brothers' efforts and this beautiful sutra.

I wish you all happiness, prosperity and love; that all your ideals, hopes and wishes may come true. May we all be beneficial to each other.

Love,
Losang Gendun


Nalanda Monastery:

is located near Toulouse in Southern France and provides an environment for Western Buddhist monks of diverse nationalities. Our aim – under the guidance of its founder Lama Zopa Rinpoche – is to provide a conducive environment for the training of Western monastics and to absorb the essential teachings of the Buddha. Our monastery is part of the Foundation for the Preservation of Mahayana Tradition (FPMT). Currently fifteen monks and some lay men receive oral teachings from Venerable Geshe Losang Jamphal PhD from Sera Jey Monastery, India.

The monastery is named 'Nalanda', recalling that legendary centre of Buddhist learning in India near Bodhgaya founded in the second century AD by the Gupta dynasty. At its zenith it boasted ten thousand students. Buddhist scriptures, logic, grammar and traditional medicine were taught there until the end of the twelfth century.

The contemporary monastery was founded in 1981 by Lama Thubten Yeshe and Lama Zopa Rinpoche to provide a conducive environment for mainly westerners, both monks and lay people, to study, meditate and practice rituals. Following the early death of his teacher Lama Thubten Yeshe, Lama Zopa Rinpoche took over as Spiritual Director as well as heading up the world organization Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition, which is at present based in Portland, USA. With the new building nearing completion and the coming five-year study program the monastery has the potential to welcome many new monks.

The actual building project involves the essential expansion of the monastery buildings which began in 1997 and is entirely funded by the generosity of others. The new building is more than 1000 m² and includes a large prayer hall, 16 bedrooms, kitchen facilities, library and office space. In order to save money, skilled volunteers do the majority of the work as every aspect of the design is focused on the use of natural building materials and ecologically sound methods. This project will dramatically increase Nalanda's ability to cater for their growing community and their ability to offer service in the future.




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